Keynote Speakers

Yi Pan
Georgia State University, USA

Title: Public Computing - Challenges and Solutions
Powerpoint

Victor C. M. Leung
University of British Columbia, Canada

Title: Filling the Generation Gap - Convergence in Wireless Networking

Arjan Durresi
Louisiana State University, USA

Title: Designing the Future Internet





Yi Pan
Yi Pan is the chair and a professor in the Department of Computer Science and a professor in the Department of Computer Information Systems at Georgia State University. Dr. Pan received his B.Eng. and M.Eng. degrees in computer engineering from Tsinghua University, China, in 1982 and 1984, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree in computer science from the University of Pittsburgh, USA, in 1991.

Dr. Pan's research interests include parallel and distributed computing, optical networks, wireless networks, and bioinformatics. Dr. Pan has published more than 100 journal papers with over 30 papers published in various IEEE journals. In addition, he has published over 100 papers in refereed conferences (including IPDPS, ICPP, ICDCS, INFOCOM, and GLOBECOM). He has also co-edited 30 books (including proceedings) and contributed several book chapters. His pioneer work on computing using reconfigurable optical buses has inspired extensive subsequent work by many researchers, and his research results have been cited by more than 100 researchers worldwide in books, theses, journal and conference papers. He is a co-inventor of three U.S. patents (pending) and 5 provisional patents, and has received many awards from agencies such as NSF, AFOSR, JSPS, IISF and Mellon Foundation. His recent research has been supported by NSF, NIH, NSFC, AFOSR, AFRL, JSPS, IISF and the states of Georgia and Ohio. He has served as a reviewer/panelist for many research foundations/agencies such as the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Australian Research Council, and the Hong Kong Research Grants Council. Dr. Pan has served as an editor-in-chief or editorial board member for 15 journals including 5 IEEE Transactions and a guest editor for 10 journals including IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience. He has organized several international conferences and workshops and has also served as a program committee member for several major international conferences such as INFOCOM, GLOBECOM, ICC, IPDPS, and ICPP.

Dr. Pan has delivered over 10 keynote speeches at many international conferences. Dr. Pan is an IEEE Distinguished Speaker (2000-2002), a Yamacraw Distinguished Speaker (2002), a Shell Oil Colloquium Speaker (2002), and a senior member of IEEE. He is listed in Men of Achievement, Who's Who in Midwest, Who's Who in America, Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who in Computational Science and Engineering, and Who's Who of Asian Americans.

For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: Public Computing - Challenges and Solutions
Abstract:
Public computing is a type of grid computing architectures composed of autonomous volunteer workstations coordinated by a central server complex over the Internet. Exploiting these distributed resources comes at the price of unpredictable availability, fluctuating performance, and heterogeneous participant nodes. Central to addressing these problems is an efficient and accurate scheduling mechanism for the public computing architecture. In this talk, I will overview grid computing in general and a public computing platform called BOINC in particular. Several major issues and challenges in grid computing research will be identified. I will also report our new research results in this exciting area through introducing a scheduling system based on the ant colony algorithm. In addition, the bottleneck problem in the client-server architecture used in BOINC will be identified and a new peer-to-peer architecture for solving the problem will be presented. Several applications have been implemented on BOINC and our new architecture using our scheduling system. By testing these applications with totally different characteristics, we show that our scheduling system consistently provides a high performance, adaptive solution to all of them, and the system using our new peer-to-peer architecture indeed performs better than BOINC. Our work also manifests that public computing can solve the problems of large computing power requirement and huge memory demand in many applications and potentially replace supercomputing for certain applications in the future.

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Victor C. M. Leung
Victor C.M. Leung received the B.A.Sc. (Hons.) and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of British Columbia (U.B.C.) in 1977 and 1981, respectively.

From 1981 to 1987, Dr. Leung was a Senior Member of Technical Staff at MPR Teltech Ltd., Burnaby, BC, Canada. In 1988, he was a Lecturer in the Department of Electronics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He returned to U.B.C. as a faculty member in 1989, where he currently holds the positions of Professor and TELUS Mobility Research Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and is a member of the Institute for Computing, Information and Cognitive Systems. He also holds a guest professorship at Jilin University, China. He was a project leader and a member of the Board of Directors in the Canadian Institute for Telecommunications Research, a Network of Centres of Excellence funded by the Canadian Government. His research interests are in the areas of architectural and protocol design and performance analysis for computer and telecommunication networks, with applications in satellite, mobile, personal communications and high speed networks. He has authored or co-authored more than 300 publications in refereed international journals and conferences.

The many academic awards that Dr. Leung has received include the APEBC Gold Medal as the head of the graduating class in the Faculty of Applied Science, UBC, and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Postgraduate Scholarships. Dr. Leung is a Fellow of IEEE and a voting member of ACM. He is an editor of the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, and an editor of the International Journal of Sensor Networks. He has served on the committees of numerous international conferences. He is serving as the General Chair of QShine 2007 in Vancouver, BC, Canada, and chairs the Next Generation Mobile Networks Symposium in IWCMC 2007 and 2006. He was the General Co-chair of IEEE/ACM MSWiM'05 in Montreal, PQ, the TPC Vice-chair of IEEE WCNC'05 in New Orleans, LA, and the Local Chair of IWCMC'06.

For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: Filling the Generation Gap - Convergence in Wireless Networking
Abstract: Wireless networking technologies have progressed rapidly over the past decades to emerge from research laboratories and become an integral part of everyday life in society. Over a short time span of less than twenty years, cellular networks have advanced through three generations. The third generation (3G) personal communication service (PCS) networks that have been rolling out in the new millennium are leading the way in service convergence, by extending not only voice service, but also messaging, web, and even television services to mobile subscribers. At the same time, many license-free wireless networking technologies such as wireless metropolitan area networks (WMANs), wireless local area networks (WLANs) and wireless personal area networks (WPANs) have emerged and are providing strong competitions to PCS offered by traditional wireless carriers. Where the road of progress in wireless networking services will lead us, and what technologies will be embraced in future generation wireless networks, are timely questions that both researchers and practitioners are trying to answer. There is now a strong consensus in the wireless networking technical community that the next generation wireless networks will be evolutionary and will embrace multiple wireless technologies and system components built upon a common IP core network. It is envisaged that advanced subscriber terminals will be equipped with multiple or smart radio interfaces, and will interact with several alternate access networks to provide the subscriber with an "always best connected" (ABC) service that is cognizant of the requirements of the subscriber's current application and the capability and quality of service supported by the diverse access alternatives. The convergent of multiple wireless networking technologies to provide a coordinated service to mobile subscribers can therefore be considered a technological trend that is filling the generation gap in wireless networking. This presentation will describe the features and characteristics of converged wireless networks, elaborate on some of the technical challenges that need to be tackled to make ABC service over converged wireless networks a reality, and describe several novel solutions we have developed to address these challenges.

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Arjan Durresi
Dr. Durresi received his B.Eng., M.Eng. and Ph.D. (all summa cum laude) in Electronics and Telecommunications, in 1986, 1991 and 1993, respectively; and a Diploma of Superior Specialization in Telecommunications from La Sapienza University in Rome, Italy and Italian Telecommunications Institute.

From 1996 to 2003, he held roles as Research Scientist of Computer Science and as Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The Ohio State University. Previously, he was senior system designer at Telesoft Inc. Rome, Italy, where he led projects in telecommunication and wireless networking. He is currently with the Department of Computer Science at Louisiana State University. His research centers on network architectures, telecommunications, wireless, and security, with emphasis on heterogeneous wireless networks, computer and network security, congestion control, traffic management, optical networks, grid computing, Quality of Service, satellite networks, and performance testing. He has published over fifty articles in journals and eighty in conference proceedings in the above areas. He is a recipient of the 2005 IEEE International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems (ICPADS) Excellent Paper Award and several other paper awards in international conferences. He also has over thirty contributions to standardization organizations such as IETF, ATM Forum, ITU, ANSI and TIA. Dr. Durresi is the recipient of various research awards. His research has been funded by NSF, the States of Ohio and Louisiana, as well as by university and industry sources.

Dr. Durresi serves as Area Editor of Ad Hoc Networks Journal. He has been Guest Editor for several international journals, including Journal of Interconnection Networks - JOIN, International Journal of Wireless and Mobile Computing - IJWMC and Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks. He has served on the committees of numerous international conferences. Dr. Durresi was Program Co-Chair of the 20th IEEE AINA-2006. He is the founder of the IEEE International Workshops on Heterogeneous Wireless Networks - HWISE and Co-Chair in 2005, 2006, and 2007. He is the Co-founder of the First International Workshop on Advances in Information Security - WAIS 2007. He was the Area Chair of IEEE AINA-2005 and Program Vice Chair of IEEE AINA-2004 conferences. Dr. Durresi has received three Certificates of Appreciations from IEEE. Dr. Durresi is a Yamacraw Distinguished Speaker (2003) and a senior member of IEEE.

For more information, refer to his home page.

Title: Designing the Future Internet
Abstract: The Internet, the greatest technological invention of our times, has become a necessity in every sector of our society. Nevertheless, the network architecture of the Internet is reaching its limits, so we must find new ways to improve its security, mobility, and accessibility. The research community is working to design the Internet of the twenty-first century, by focusing on the desirable architectural functionalities. The approach gaining general consensus is the "clean slate" one, which is unconstrained by the properties of today's Internet. In this talk I will identify several problems with today's Internet, as well as major issues and challenges about the design of the Future Internet. The next generation Internet has to be commerce friendly and secure. It should allow receivers to set policies for how and where they receive their information. The next generation Internet should be designed for mobile objects. Naming, addressing architecture, and routing have to be such that these objects can move and decide how and where they want to receive their Internet traffic with full rights of privacy of their location, if desired. I will continue with an overview of major ongoing efforts designing the various aspects of the Future Internet's architecture. I will also talk about our ideas and solutions for a new networking architecture. Our framework is based on a recursive hierarchy of realms, which follows the organizational structure of commercial organizations. The new architecture enables network scalability, service flexibility, node mobility and personalized security.

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